Dwarf hairgrass

Dwarf hairgrass (Eleocharis parvula) is one of the best aquarium plants, if you need to create a ‘real lawn’ in a tank. This is a representative of coastal-aquatic vegetation, which natural habitat spreads all over the world and this fact consequently shows that the plant is easy to keep.

Due to its ability to cover the substrate surface with thick green carpet, Dwarf hairgrass is more often used in the foreground of a tank, which helps to imitate thick green lawns or grassplots.

Keep reading…Dwarf hairgrass

Anubias types and care

Anubias is an inconsiderable in number genus of tropical aquatic (paludal) plants of Araceae family. This family also includes cryptocorynes to which we have already devoted a separate article.

What these plants have in common, is their ability to grow both under water and in semi-submerged state. In the wild Anubias species grow in their emersed state most part of the year and only during the rain season the plants get completely submerged.

Keep reading…Anubias types and care

Dwarf baby tears plant or Hemianthus Callitrichoides Cuba

Dwarf baby tears plant (Hemianthus Callitrichoides Cuba, also known as baby tears, cuba or HC) is rather challenging to keep, but a very good looking aquarium plant.

This is a ground-covering plant, which is one of the smallest aquarium plants and one of the most wanted by aquarists. The plant is perfect for the front plan of nano tanks.

It is very often used when decorating tanks in Iwagumi style (the name originates from the word iwa – «a stone» and gumi – «arrangement»). Dwarf baby tears plant is the most renowned, but rather demanding plant used in aquascaping. This plant creates incredibly beautiful carpet on the tank bottom.

Keep reading…Dwarf baby tears plant or Hemianthus Callitrichoides Cuba

Cabomba caroliniana

Cabomba caroliniana (which is also called Carolina fanwort, Carolina water shield, green cabomba, fanwort, fish grass, Washington grass) is one of the most renowned and widespread long-stalked aquarium plants.

There are five Cabomba species known for now, plus newly appeared hybrids. Luckily, growing conditions for all these species are almost identical. They differ only in their appearance and growth rate.

Keep reading…Cabomba caroliniana